Convergence Culture – Jenkins

August 18th, 2010

Welcome to convergence culture, where old and new media collide, where grassroots and corporate media intersect, where the power of the media producer and the power o the media consumer interact in unpredictable ways. (2)

Jenkins, Henry. Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. NYU Press, 2008.

Media Convergence
Jenkins defines media convergence as “[T]he flow of content across multiple media platforms, the cooperation between multiple media industries, and the migratory behavior of media audiences who will go almost anywhere in search of the kinds of entertainment experiences they want” (2). He is in part discussing media (mediums) such as Web, FtF, still image, etc. and also media as in the news media. This definition refers to content that might begin, for example, as a still image that is distributed via the web and might later be downloaded and used in someone’s video, which might then be posted in a different location. Similarly, once an image or video is publicly accessible, the news (or other) media industry could conceivably obtain it and use it for a given purpose, thus (re)distributing it to a certain area or even internationally. In this example, none of the instances are really using the same or original image; it is repurposed, remediated, and transformed in some manner with each iteration. Read the rest of this entry »

Convergence

August 16th, 2010

Bolter, Jay David, and Richard Grusin. Remediation: Understanding New Media. The MIT Press, 2000.

The promise of push-pull media is to marry the programming experience of television with two key yearnings: navigating information and experience, and connecting to other people. (By Kevin Kelly and Gary Wolf, “Push” in Wired Magazine Issue 5.03 | Mar 1997).

In Chapter 14, Bolter and Grusin discuss the concept of “Convergence,” based on a 1997 article from Wired magazine, in which the editors proclaimed the end of the Web browser in favor of the new push technology formed of the convergence of existing electronic technology. The wired editors go on to suggest that the many media of cyberspace are converging as if being pulled together in a way as powerful and unavoidable as gravity. Specifically, this convergence is comprised of the telephone, television, and Internet and offers a more full bodied experience. Read the rest of this entry »

Mediation and Remediation

August 12th, 2010

Bolter, Jay David, and Richard Grusin. Remediation: Understanding New Media. The MIT Press, 2000.

In chapter two, the authors discuss Mediation and Remediation. They note that while hypermedia and transparent media are opposites in design, they have a common goal: to move beyond representations and attain the real. However, the real is not some objective, universal truth that applies to all and that one can uncover. “The real is defined in terms of the viewer’s experience; it is that which would evoke an immediate (and therefore authentic) emotional response” (53). So, transparent media tries to hide the fact that it is mediated, while hypermedia puts this fact up front and strives to offer the user a richer experience, thus invoking a fuller reality. Read the rest of this entry »

Immediacy, Hypermediacy, and Remediation

August 8th, 2010

Bolter, Jay David, and Richard Grusin. Remediation: Understanding New Media. The MIT Press, 2000.

Repurposing as remediation is both what is “unique to digital worlds” and what denies the possibility of that uniqueness” (50).

In chapter one of this text, the authors discuss immediacy, hypermediacy, and remediation. Fittingly, they offer the disclaimer that they make no claim that any of these three concepts are universal truths, but rather that they are practices of specific groups at specific times. Read the rest of this entry »

Exploring Learning through Visual, Actional and Linguistic Communication: The Multimodal Environment of a Science Classroom.

August 3rd, 2010

Jewitt, Carey, et al. “Exploring Learning through Visual, Actional and Linguistic Communication: The Multimodal Environment of a Science Classroom.” Educational Review 53 1 (2001): 5-18.

From the abstract:

It suggests that learning is realised through the interaction between visual, actional and linguistic communication (i.e. learning is multimodal) and involves the transformation of information across different communicative systems (‘modes’), e.g. from speech to image. It demonstrates that learning is a process of selection, adaptation and transformation motivated by the interests of pupils and the context of learning” (5).

This finding is quite important to my research, since it suggest that it is this multimodality of seeing, doing, and discussing that is most effective for learning. Furthermore, Read the rest of this entry »