Cyberliteracy (4) – Distance Education

May 23rd, 2010

Gurak, L. J. (2001). Cyberliteracy: Navigating the internet with awareness. New Haven Conn.; London: Yale University Press.

Even in 2001 (when Cyberliteracy was published), the use of the internet for distance education was growing. Gurak addresses this point from sort of a media richness perspective.

“The richest form of communication has always been face-to-face. Humans can communicate so much with their bodies. Read the rest of this entry »

Cyberliteracy(3) – Anonymity and Interactivity

May 22nd, 2010

Gurak, L. J. (2001). Cyberliteracy: Navigating the internet with awareness. New Haven Conn.; London: Yale University Press.

Beyond Reach and Speed, the features of anonymity and interactivity define cyberliteracy even more.

Anonymity
Anonymity refers to the fact that in most settings, we can never really be sure who is on the other end. Read the rest of this entry »

Cyberliteracy(2) – Speed and Reach

May 21st, 2010

Gurak, L. J. (2001). Cyberliteracy: Navigating the internet with awareness. New Haven Conn.; London: Yale University Press.

In Chapter two of Cyberliteracy, Laura Gurak discusses speed, reach, anonymity, and interactivity, “[T]he functional units by which most Internet communication takes place (29).” She notes that whether they are working alone or in combination, they help explain how we communicate online.

Speed
“Speed does not equal salvation; the speed of the Internet does not necessarily bring us closer to any sort of utopia. But speed is certainly changing how we live and what we expect, and it may be changing our mental states as well” (30). Read the rest of this entry »

Cyberliteracy (1)

May 19th, 2010

“To be cyberliterate means that we need to understand the relationship between our communication technologies and ourselves, our communities, and our cultures (16).”

Gurak, L. J. (2001). Cyberliteracy: Navigating the internet with awareness. New Haven Conn.; London: Yale University Press.

Gurak defines cyberliteracy as “a critical technology literacy, one that includes performance, but also relies heavily on people’s ability to understand, criticize, and make judgments about a technology’s interactions with, and effects on, culture (13).” Noting Kathleen Welch, she goes on to state that “Cyberliteracy… is about consciousness. It is about taking a critical perspective on a technology that is radically transforming the world (16).” Read the rest of this entry »